Panic Attack Hangover: The Aftermath

When most people think of panic attacks, a certain image comes to mind. Maybe it’s one of someone sitting on the floor in a far corner, or on a chair bent over, hands over their ears, or on their head, hyperventilating and struggling to breathe normally. For some, that’s the case. But nobody ever talks about what happens after. I  recently read an article that sums up what happens when one has a panic attack “hangover”–and I just had one.

This is one post I could do without writing, but I feel compelled to write, so bear with me a moment, would you?

As I type this, after spending 25 minutes in panic attack mode, I’m still struggling to ground myself. I’m still in a dissociated, not-quite-here-yet state of mind. My mouth feels dry even though I just ate a salad drenched in lemon juice and Italian dressing. My hands are still shaking and my brain is still going 100mph. 25 minutes may not seem like a long time, but when you are in the midst of a panic attack, especially one that evolves into a flashback, you lose the sense of time. It’s 5:19pm right now, according to my clock, but that means nothing to me. I have a major headache from crying so much in that 25-minute time span. My eyes hurt and I am emotionally and mentally exhausted; I’m surprised my brain hasn’t exploded yet. For now, I need to take care of myself. I think a shower and a nap could help. Maybe tomorrow will be better.

2 Comments Add yours

  1. Maybe you’re right. Side note: writing while dissociated is a weird thing.

    Like

  2. It seems to me that if you can write about this this way, especially so soon after the episode, you are well on the road to recovery. A shower and nap sound like an excellent idea.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.